Things – A Discourse in 3 Cups of Coffee

But in physics, it’s dangerous to assume that things ‘exist’ in any conventional sense. Instead, the deeper question is: what sorts of processes give rise to the notion (or illusion) that something exists?

Karl Friston

 

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Timelapse of a budding plant merged into one photo. (c) 2017 Dietmar Tallroth

A Western school of thinking from the Greek philosopher Heraclitus to the English mathematician and philosopher Alfred N. Whitehead (1861-1947) has maintained the idea that reality is better viewed and understood in terms of processes than in terms of substance, objects and things. This school, loosely termed “process philosophy” has implications on visual art, so let’s have a look.

 

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The Discovery of Slowness

2017-07-05-Höga Kusten-0397.jpgWhen the novel by Sten Nadolny with the same title as this post first was published in 1983, slowness was still mostly a synonym for mental retardedness. The value of slowness indeed needed discovery. Since then slow has become hip. We have a slow movement encompassing slow food, Cittaslow, slow parenting, slow gardening and even slow fashion. And, of course, we have slow photography.

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Documentary: Being Hear

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Being hear  – I love that, except for that it’s not my invention. It’s the title of a documentary by Matthew Mikkelsen and Palmer Morse about sound ecologist Gordon Hempton. Wait, sound ecologist? Yes, that’s right Hempton explores and records the ambient sounds – and the silence of – nature.

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So Long, Frank

2017-06-08-Viiala-0082.jpgCurrently two of the most prominent modern architects have large exhibitions. MoMA has a show on occasion of Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birthday. At the same time, the National Gallery of Finland, Atheneum is showing Alvar Aalto – Art and the Modern Form.

Although there are 30 years age difference between these two architects, they have much in common.

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